Event Information
Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 9:00 PM
Dir. Claude Barras | France | 2016 | 75 min. | PG-13 | DCP
Preceded by The Genie in a Tin of Raviolis (7min), a short film from the same director.
Event Pricing
General Admission Adult - $10.00
General Admission Senior - $8.00
General Admission Student - $8.50
General Admission Military - $8.50
General Admission Child - $8.00
General Admission Group Sale - $9.00

 
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Screening before 5pm are dubbed in English. Screenings after 6pm are In French with English subtitles.

Brought to life through memorable character designs and expressive stop-motion animation, the Oscar-nominated MY LIFE AS A ZUCCHINI soars with laughter, sorrow and joy, and stands as a testament to the resilience of the human heart. After his mother’s sudden death, Zucchini is befriended by a police officer, Raymond, who accompanies him to his new foster home, filled with other orphans his age. At first he struggles to find his place in this at times strange and hostile environment. But with Raymond’s help and his newfound friends, Zucchini eventually learns to trust and love, as he searches for a new family of his own. From its debut in Director’s Fortnight at Cannes to winning audience awards at festivals around the world, this accomplished debut feature from director Claude Barras, based on a script from acclaimed writer/director Céline Sciamma (GIRLHOOD), has now been nominated for both an Academy Award® and Golden Globe Award® for Best Animated Feature.

Programmer’s Note: Depending on style of parenting, the age-appropriateness may be 7+, or it could be 13+. Its style is not pure entertainment, though it is very entertaining and the themes are serious. Like DUMBO. Add to that a genuinely funny twice-recurring reproductive joke about “exploding willies,” and the call is yours to make.

“There are many reasons that Céline Sciamma (GIRLHOOD) has ascended to the apex of coming-of-age cinema—the French writer/director's empathetic but never candy-coated view of growing up ranks among the most powerful. It should come as little surprise that the latest film boasting her involvement radiates an abundance of compassion for its youthful characters and their efforts to cope with their difficult situation. “ —Sarah Ward, ArtsHub (AU)

“Leave it to a French-language stop-motion film to cut closer to the reality of the orphan experience than ANNIE, MATILDA or any number of like-minded live-action melodramas have over the years—assuming, of course, you can get past the whimsical fact that its parentless wretch sports blue hair and a potato-shaped noggin.” —Peter Debruge, Variety

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