Event Information
Drive-In: SELENA
Sunday, Sep 20, 2020 7:15 PM
Dir. Gregory Nava | USA | 1997 | 127 min. | PG | DCP

In English and some Spanish

Lot opens one hour before showtime
Event Pricing
Drive-in General Admission - $30.00

 
Ticket Selection
 
Ticket Availability
Sold Out

Part of Belcourt Drive-In.

Tickets go on sale to Belcourt members Thu, Sep 10 at 3:00pm. Any remaining tickets will go on sale to the general public Fri, Sep 11 at 3:00pm.

Tickets are $25/vehicle for Belcourt members and $30/vehicle for non-members.

If you’re not currently a Belcourt member, purchase a membership before tickets go on sale, and you’ll have membership access.


Mexican-American and veteran recording artist Abraham Quintanilla (Edward James Olmos) attempts to sustain his family playing low-paying gigs with his band Los Dinos across South Texas. After years of struggling to expand beyond their regional fan base and failing to please racially divided white and brown audiences, Abraham refocuses his energy on his growing family. When his charismatic, pre-teen daughter Selena catches him off-guard with her natural vocal skills, Abraham begins grooming his kids to pick up and succeed where he left off. Director Gregory Nava's (EL NORTE) beloved biopic SELENA stars Jennifer Lopez in her breakout role – delivering a respected portrayal of the Grammy Award winning, multi-platinum Tejano music legend Selena Quintanilla-Pérez.

“SELENA uses warmth and humor to introduce viewers to a tightly knit Mexican-American family striving to overcome prejudice and realize a shared dream… An affectionate tribute.” —Bob Smithouser, Plugged In

"SELENA succeeds, through Lopez's performance, in evoking the magic of a sweet and talented young woman. And, like [director Gregory] Nava's MY FAMILY, it's insightful in portraying Mexican-American culture as a rich resource with its own flavor and character.” —Roger Ebert (1997)

“Not only was she the first female star in Tejano music, but her appeal was so broad that she attracted fans in the splintered Spanish-language music world far beyond her original Tex-Mex constituency. Music was a major part of that, but so was Selena's role-model image as a self-confident beauty who worked hard to achieve her dream and yet managed to remain genuine. At its best, SELENA suggests why so many people reacted with such great heartbreak to her death.” —Richard Harrington, Washington Post

The Belcourt Theatre does not provide advisories about subject matter or potential triggering content, as sensitivities vary from person to person.

Beyond the synopses, trailers and review links on our website, other sources of information about content and age-appropriateness for specific films can be found on Common Sense MediaIMDb and DoesTheDogDie.com as well as through general internet searches.